Plants  >  Brugmansia
Brugmansia insignis

“A mysterious, and elusive part of the Brugmansia species in which most true facts are unverified and not yet fully understood. To date, it does not appear to be available in cultivation or have genetic research discovering it’s individual characteristics....”

Quoted: RJ La Fraugh

 

More Brugmansia insignis research to come....

Please let us know if you have any conclusive findings!

 

 

Brugmansia versicolor

Brugmansia versicolor

by Delisa Harvey

Brugmansia versicolor grows in the tropical regions of Ecuador and has the largest bloom of all species of Brugmansia, reaching a length of 12 to 20+ inches. Versicolor flowers always hang down vertically and are often strongly scented in the evening.  Brugmansia versicolor usually has more blooms at one time than any other Brugmansia species. Bloom bursts can last between 2 to 4 weeks with a growth phase between 1 to 2 months on average before the bloom growth returns. One identifying characteristic of versicolor is the buds that reach a certain point in development stop growing until the other buds catch up, and they will all open at or near the same time.  Leaves may or may not be softly hairy and are usually elliptic to oblong smooth-edged, sometimes wavy edged. The calyx is usually very short, and has a slit on one side with the narrowed part of the corolla at the end of the calyx, with the characteristic narrow corolla being far extended from the calyx before widening. Seed pods are usually 10 to 18 inches long; spindle shaped like a green bean, and is the longest seed pod of other Brugmansia species.

 

Reference:

Preissel, Ulrike, & Preissel, Hans-Georg (2002). Brugmansia and Datura, Angel Trumpets and Thorn Apples. Buffalo: Firefly Books.

Brugmansia aurea

Brugmansia aurea

by Delisa Harvey

Brugmansia aurea comes from the Andes region in Columbia, Venezuela and Ecuador.  A small tree reaching to 25 ft. with either smooth or somewhat hairy leaves, is very strong growing, and has the largest leaves of all Brugmansia.  The leaves on young plants are sometimes coarsely-toothed, while those on mature plants are smooth-edged.  A heavy frost will kill this Brugmansia, like all Brugmansia in this group.   The calyx is slit, possessing 2 to 5 teeth, and flowers are usually 6-10 inches long, nodding to upright. At dusk and through the night, the scent is very strong and sweetly fragrant. The narrow part of the corolla tube is completely concealed by the calyx. The matured fruit is egg-shaped, averaging 3-6 inches long, containing large seeds with corky seed coats. The seeds are the largest of all Brugmansia seed.

References:
http://florawww.eeb.uconn.edu/200200022.html
http://www.abads.org

Brugmansia suaveolens

Brugmansia suaveolens

by Delisa Harvey

This shrub or small tree (usually 6-15 ft.) comes from Southeast Brasil, bearing smooth-textured or minutely hairy leaves. The leaf shape is ovate to narrowly elliptic with smooth edges.  The corolla, generally white is funnel-shaped and constricted at the point of emergence from the calyx so as to leave a space between calyx and corolla.  Corolla tips are very short being less than 1 inch long and flaring, but with no recurved edge. B. suaveolens flowers continuously (free flowering) with the heaviest flowering periods occurring every 2-4 weeks. Suaveolens flowers in a pendulous to horizontal position and is highly fragrant. The anthers are completely fused together and are the only species in this group to show this feature.  Originally living at forest edges or next to rivers, suaveolens tolerates soggy soils better than other Brugmansia species. The fruit is elongated and slightly flat in shape like a chili pepper and measures 4-8+ inches long. Tan to light brown in color, the seed is the smallest of the Brugmansia species.

Reference:

Preissel, Ulrike, & Preissel, Hans-Georg (2002). Brugmansia and Datura, Angel Trumpets and Thorn Apples. Buffalo: Firefly Books.

 

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